Economic Benefits

NPR: What does it take to land America’s fastest growing job?

Wind turbine technician jobs are expected to grow by 108 percent in the coming decade.
NPR: What does it take to land America’s fastest growing job?
Print Friendly

NPR recently took a look at what it’s like to be a wind turbine technician, America’s fastest growing occupation. How do you get the job? What’s the day-to-day like?

For answers, NPR interviewed Daniel Lutat, Director of Sustainable Resources and Technologies at Iowa Lakes Community College, home to one of the nation’s leading wind tech programs.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation:

  • “Really, job placement takes care of itself. The dilemma that graduates have from these programs is that they’ve got to choose which company to take a job with. They’re being fought over because the demand for properly trained technicians is very high.
  • “So when it comes to wind energy, I think — especially where Iowa is concerned, you’ve seen a lot of Democrat and Republican cooperation on this — it’s simply because it’s a good thing. We can generate 10 times more electricity from wind alone than the continent’s gonna use for the foreseeable future. So that’s really what this kind of bridge technology does for us.”
  • “A wind technician is a person who basically is kind of a jack of all trades — you’re maintaining everything from power generation systems to mechanical systems, instrumentation, communication systems… really each turbine can be viewed like an airplane on a stick, I guess. So in everything from the construction phase all the way through the operations and maintenance and the post-warranty phase, these technicians really are bumper-to-bumper maintenance guys.”

For a closer look at life as a wind turbine technician, check out these videos:


Economic Benefits

Greg is the Writer and Content Manager for AWEA. He is the head editor and writer for Into the Wind, and oversees AWEA's online content and opinion writing. Greg holds a Master's degree in Global Environmental Policy from American University's School of International Service. He also holds a Bachelor's degree in International Relations and Journalism from Lehigh University.

More in Economic Benefits

Into the Wind provides the latest news and expert opinion from the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA).

1501 M Street, NW, Suite 1000 | Washington, DC 20005

Phone: 202.383.2500 | Fax: 202.383.2505

Sitemap | Privacy | Terms of Use

Copyright 2015 American Wind Energy Association. All Rights Reserved.

Sign up to have the latest wind energy news delivered to your inbox.

Enter your email and instantly subscribe.

x